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Matthaeus

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Cum autem Ottocari huius et Kynixbergae mentio facta sit, operae pretium est Aeneae Sylvii errorem, quem nonnulli alii scriptores secuti sunt, redarguere, qui Ottocarum hunc omnes eas regiones, quae inter Boemiam et mare Baltheum sunt, imperio suo subiecisse, devictisque Tartaris Kynixbergam arcem et oppidum in Prussia condidisse scribit.

Again, as I've asked before, a relative clause of characteristic within an AcI clause ought, classically speaking, to take the subjunctive, but it's not always so in later authors?
 

Matthaeus

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Plurimis vero aliis laudibus eum cumulari a Bascone annalium scriptore, Custode Posnaniensi, Dlugossus memorat.

Why passive? Dluggosus recalls that he [Premislaus] has been heaped up with many other praises by Basco, writer of annals and defender of Posnan?? Can this be rendered into more idiomatic English? It would have made more sense had it been plurimas vero alias laudes eum cumulasse a Bascone...
 

Matthaeus

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Quae cum non darent, coniecit eos in taetrum carcerem, constrictos compedibus. Qua re cognita Fulco Archiepiscopus Gnesnensis, Lenciciam synodum convocavit, ac de synodi sententia Boleslaum Calvum diris divovit. Vratislaviensi vero omni diaecesi sacris interdixit.

I've come across these phrases in the text before. Could it be something like "the bishop cursed him ritually/with sacred rites"? To be ritually denounced?
 

Matthaeus

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Capio, est quidem sententia auctoris.
 

Agrippa

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...
Plurimis vero aliis laudibus eum cumulari a Bascone annalium scriptore, Custode Posnaniensi, Dlugossus memorat.
Why passive? ....
Active: cumulare alqm/alqd re (transitive verb): to overload sb/sth with sth.
Passive: aliquis/aliquid aliqua re cumulatur
 

Matthaeus

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ah nice, the etymology of exsecratus - lit. to kick someone out of the sacred ceremony or community, id est, to curse ;)
 

Matthaeus

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Sed interim Thomas [episcopus] pertaesus diri carceris, duobus millibus marcarum et commutatione decimarum manipularium in pecuniarias per totam dioecesim suam, una cum praeposito et canonico se redemit.

I know that manipularis means "of a common soldier", but it definitely goes with decimarum, and that pecuniary matter is altogether unclear as well.

The thing is that Boleslaus raided Thomas the bishop of his goods, took him and some other canons to Legnica against his will and demanded ten thousand marks (marcae) from them. Thomas refused to pay this sum, thereupon the prince threw them into prison. Then, the archbishop of Gniezno diris eum devovit, excommunicated him and cursed the entire dioecese of Vratislavia. Thomas got tired of sitting in the dreadful jail... then something about two thousand marks being exchanged for.... no idea.
 

Pacifica

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View attachment 15953

Cum autem Ottocari huius et Kynixbergae mentio facta sit, operae pretium est Aeneae Sylvii errorem, quem nonnulli alii scriptores secuti sunt, redarguere, qui Ottocarum hunc omnes eas regiones, quae inter Boemiam et mare Baltheum sunt, imperio suo subiecisse, devictisque Tartaris Kynixbergam arcem et oppidum in Prussia condidisse scribit.

Again, as I've asked before, a relative clause of characteristic within an AcI clause ought, classically speaking, to take the subjunctive, but it's not always so in later authors?
The question here has already been answered but, by the way, that isn't what's usually called a relative clause of characteristic. A relative clause of characteristic always takes the subjunctive, by definition.
View attachment 15964
Sed interim Thomas [episcopus] pertaesus diri carceris, duobus millibus marcarum et commutatione decimarum manipularium in pecuniarias per totam dioecesim suam, una cum praeposito et canonico se redemit.

I know that manipularis means "of a common soldier", but it definitely goes with decimarum, and that pecuniary matter is altogether unclear as well.

The thing is that Boleslaus raided Thomas the bishop of his goods, took him and some other canons to Legnica against his will and demanded ten thousand marks (marcae) from them. Thomas refused to pay this sum, thereupon the prince threw them into prison. Then, the archbishop of Gniezno diris eum devovit, excommunicated him and cursed the entire dioecese of Vratislavia. Thomas got tired of sitting in the dreadful jail... then something about two thousand marks being exchanged for.... no idea.
I thought decimae manipulares must be some sort of tithes in kind, as opposed to decimae pecuniariae, tithes in money.

I found this in some PDF, which says they're tithes in grain:
Decimae Manipulares.PNG

-niarias.
 
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Pacifica

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In this case, the adjective manipularis would refer to manipulus in the sense of a bundle (of grain).
 

Matthaeus

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Thanks! That helps greatly!
 

Matthaeus

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Calissiae intra octavum diem natalis Christi natus est vitulus cum duobus caninis capitibus, atque dentibus et septem pedibus vitulinis. Capitum autem maius quidem in loco suo, minus vero ad caudam situm erat....

At first I thought this is a typo for caput, but this morning it occurred to me that it is a partitive genitive (unless my terminology fails me, lol), as in "the greater of the two was in its place, however, the lesser one was placed near the tail."
 

Matthaeus

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His igitur de causis plures infensi erant Boleslao, sperabantque mutatione principis defunctum se iri malis illis.

"They hoped that, with a different prince, they would have done with these misfortunes."

Didn't know deponent verbs could be used with a future passive infinitive; but I guess, as with all deponents, the meaning is active.

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Verum Boleslaus explorata Vratislaviensium apparatu, magna celeritate Saxonas, Misnios, Bavaros, atque Suevos mercede conduxit, et prior in Vratislaviensem oram impetum fecit.

This doesn't really fit in with the rest of the sentence, does it? Perhaps you require more context?
 

Agrippa

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... Capitum autem maius quidem in loco suo, minus vero ad caudam situm erat....
... "the greater of the two was in its place, however, the lesser one was placed near the tail."
Placet.
View attachment 15970
... sperabantque mutatione principis defunctum se iri malis illis. ...
View attachment 15971
Verum Boleslaus explorata Vratislaviensium apparatu, magna celeritate Saxonas, Misnios, Bavaros, atque Suevos mercede conduxit...
defunctum se iri: Nescio an insolitus hic modus infinitivus in vitiosa sit infimae Latinitatis consuetudine. (> Inf. fut.: defuncturos se esse.)
explorata: Mendum videtur esse typographicum > "explorato ... apparatu"; cf. https://books.google.de/books?id=T6DOApl5EnUC&pg=PA160&lpg=PA160&dq="verum+boleslaus+explorato"&source=bl&ots=IUUbRx1pau&sig=ACfU3U0On8f1AcaIScW4VeWxz33TfXutVw&hl=de&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiH_Zeq1cvyAhXI_7sIHSjZA78Q6AF6BAgLEAM#v=onepage&q="verum boleslaus explorato"&f=false
 

Matthaeus

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I find it curious how some words, like sacer, allow for completely antithetical interpretations (holy, sacred vs. accursed, wicked, etc.). Another one is deprecor (avert, ward off (usu. something evil) vs. pray for, intercede on behalf of). Dudum can mean both "a while ago" and "a long time ago." I know this would mostly depend upon context, but it's very easy to make the wrong interpretation. Do you know of any others?
 

Agrippa

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Ecce exemplum:
valetudo: state of health > either good health or ill health. Quamobrem vox valetudinis "vox media" dicitur.
 

Matthaeus

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The question here has already been answered but, by the way, that isn't what's usually called a relative clause of characteristic. A relative clause of characteristic always takes the subjunctive, by definition.
Yesss, I knew that! Facepalm. Poor choice of terminology on my end again. I meant something like "a descriptive [subordinate] clause within an indirect statement."
 
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