Martini Cromeri ex sexto decimo libro de origine & rebus gestis Polonorum nonnulli loci dubii

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
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Etenim cum expedita manu clam in Masoviam ingressi, Ioannem ducem Cirnensium nihil hostile suspicantem, in praedio quodam, sive apud Zlotoriam arcem, quam tunc ligneam aedificabat, cepere, et equo impositum, ac subter alvum equi pedes indigne colligatum, arce incensa secum abduxere etc...

...they put him on a horse, and dishonorably tied him below the horse's belly with respect to his feet??
is pedes an accusative of respect or something here?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Yes.
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
Ok, but it doesn't really make sense to me. Is there a better way to understand this? :think:
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
His feet were bound under the horse's belly. I suppose that means his feet were tied one to the other with some length of rope between them, and that length of rope went under the horse's belly, so that the man was effectively tied to the horse that way. Do you see what I mean?
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
I guess so. Still, it could have been rendered more clearly in the original.
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
Definitely not one of my fav grammatical constructions, I find it weird. Is there something corresponding to a similar Greek construction?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
I mean, does the accusative of respect exist in that language? Like I asked before concerning "habeo dicendum" or something like that.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
The accusative of respect exists in Greek, yes, and is more common there than in Latin.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
It's even sometimes called "the Greek accusative".
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
ok, gals, thanks for your input! :) Greatly appreciated!
 
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