Martini Cromeri ex sexto libro de origine & rebus gestis Polonorum nonnulli loci dubii

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
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Ad fratrem etiam proficiscuntur et quoniam caput illorum consiliorum Cristinam glotem suam esse senserant, ad mulieres pedes sese prosternunt et clementiam eius supplices implorant.

Unable to find this word anywhere. Could it be a typo?
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
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Venatum forte Vladislaus princeps et Petrus his in remotas sylvas ierant. Ibi totum diem investigandis et persequendis feris defatigati, ad vesperum ad focum constructa e caespite mensa, cum se pane et ferina carne et aqua fontana utcunque refecissent, etc...

a table made out of turf? Any suggestions?
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
No, I'm merely asking whether I'm getting this right.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
View attachment 15829

Ad fratrem etiam proficiscuntur et quoniam caput illorum consiliorum Cristinam glotem suam esse senserant, ad mulieres pedes sese prosternunt et clementiam eius supplices implorant.

Unable to find this word anywhere. Could it be a typo?
I was not familiar with that word either. It's a rare one, which the OLD defines as "a husband's sister". That doesn't make sense here, but I thought it was likely to have acquired the sense "brother's wife" later on. And indeed this medieval Latin dictionary says so:

glos (genet. gloris) (class. «belle-sœur — sister-in-law»): femme du frèrebrother's wife.

The word in your text looks more like glotem than glorem; maybe there's a typo in the dictionary, or in your text, or there are variants, or whatnot.
View attachment 15830

Venatum forte Vladislaus princeps et Petrus his in remotas sylvas ierant. Ibi totum diem investigandis et persequendis feris defatigati, ad vesperum ad focum constructa e caespite mensa, cum se pane et ferina carne et aqua fontana utcunque refecissent, etc...

a table made out of turf? Any suggestions?
That seems right.
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
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Sic infelix Vladislaus, qui suasu uxoris iniuste aliena concupiverat, sua iuste amisit, et qui in amplissima fortuna principatusque praerogativa non acquieverat, in exilio cum mala consultrice uxore miser contabuit, quemadmodum inferius exponemus.

I'm not satisfied with any L&S connotation for this word, and have no access to the OLD.
Any suggestions what this could be? A privilege?

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Imposuerunt autem conditores illi tributum perenne oppidanis, addictis monasterio: ut corda caesarum pecudum, et paucula haleca sibi posterisque suis memoriae sempiternae gloriae penderent.

Again, W T F ?!
Suggestions are greatly appreciated!
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
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...qui basilicam Vrastislaviensem, ligneam ad id tempus, muro exaedificavit, ritusque Lugdunensis basilicae in eam induxit.

I'm taking ritus as accusative plural, being modified by Lugdunensis basilicae.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
View attachment 15840
...qui basilicam Vrastislaviensem, ligneam ad id tempus, muro exaedificavit, ritusque Lugdunensis basilicae in eam induxit.

I'm taking ritus as accusative plural, being modified by Lugdunensis basilicae.
That's right.
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
Auctoris scribendi ratio ita sese habet....quid dicam...et "Vuladislaus" invenitur...
Ahhh modo mihi aliquid in mentem venit:
Fortasse eo modo voluit litteram "W" typis reddere, id est, duplice "u", quod Anglice "double U" vocatur, nescio.
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
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Nam consultore malo Henrico Ketlicio utens, initio statim aspero et avaro dominatu, hominum voluntates offendit. Nova onera, nova vectigalia, varias exactiones equitibus iuxta ac plebeis imponens, et levibus de causis, velut ob caesum ursum aut cervum, captamve dorcam, bonorum confiscatione multans.

Surely not a gazelle?? These don't exist in Poland, and never have, afaik.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
No, a kind of deer, probably a roe deer as Etaoin had guessed.
 

Etaoin Shrdlu

μεσσηγυδορποχέστης
I deleted my guess in the assumption that it was goats after all. I was going to ask about why we needed an extra word for goats, and even if we felt that we did, why we should borrow it from an animal that didn't really look much like a goat, but considered that nobody was likely to be able to shed any light on the matter.

Edit: and I hadn't looked at the LSJ link.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Deceptively, caprea doesn't mean a goat (capra does).
 

Etaoin Shrdlu

μεσσηγυδορποχέστης
But salix caprea is goat willow. Now we have moved from ungulates to plants, about which I know even less, so I am weeping. And it isn't even French.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Of course capreus, caprea, capreum is an adjective meaning "relating to goats, goat-". Why the feminine form of this became a noun meaning roe deer, I know not.
 
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