News (Languages) Mystery of the Voynich manuscript SOLVED!

rothbard

Aedilis
Staff member
These days the higher doctorates are hardly ever awarded, but they were originally meant for people who had made a substantial contribution to their field of study. Apparently they used to be so prestigious that if Professors got one they would be addressed as "Doctor" rather than "Professor". In the former Soviet Union, the title of Doktor nauk is similar.
 

Callaina

Feles Curiosissima
Incidentally, it costs 2395€ to publish an article in Romance Studies, where the piece about the manuscript appeared.

Wait, they make you pay to publish your work there? What sort of academic journal does that?!???
 

Terry S.

Quaestor
Staff member
Doctor of Divinity (DD): Awarded above the Doctor of Theology (DTh), usually to recognize the recipient’s ministry-oriented accomplishments.
In the Pontifical system, the DD is higher than a PhD. too. To just get on the programme takes a thorough knowledge of Greek and Hebrew (Latin being assumed) and at least two modern languages, although more would be a considerable advantage. A Licentiate is also required for entry.
 

scrabulista

Consul
Staff member

scrabulista

Consul
Staff member
Figure 60 shows a detail from an official letter by Alfonso V, for comparison with De Rosa. It reads: Alfonsus dei gracia Rex Aragome (Alfonzo of the gracious, King of Aragon: Italian, Spanish, Old Portuguese). Note that his language also uses words now found in various Romance languages, as he was Spanish by birth

Hmm...It could be Alfonsus dei gratia Rex Aragonis (Alfonsus, King of Aragon, by the grace of God: all Latin). Although there was something in there about "if you know Old Turkish, you'll see Old Turkish; if you know Latin, you'll see Latin." I agree it is a lower case d. There is not much of the t above the cross stroke if any, so maybe it is a c. That last stroke of the m could be an i and the script e could be an s.

1615934255190.png
 
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Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú

scrabulista

Consul
Staff member
Actually, that gives another point to make:
Apparently (not to be malicious) the work he did, or the basis at least, had no citations. (Perhaps not, I'm not sure of what to make of this website's information.)

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.researchgate.net/profile/Gerard_Cheshire/amp
It means no one has cited his work. Maybe it's too new. Possibly someone has cited the 2017 publication by now, but no one has posted it on researchgate. I have not put all my publications on researchgate.

Did anyone save the publication? I could ask him for a copy on researchgate (I'm not going to pay the $43 to t&f). It's just that a colleague and I got talking about flawed research....
 
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Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú

scrabulista

Consul
Staff member
I came across his paper...I should have been more confident in saying that what it says is "Alfonsus dei gratia Rex Aragonis."
It's all the worse since this fellow is almost surely a British subject.

1616039554521.png1616039987490.png

Are George VI coins still in circulation? I couldn't find any that spelled out "gratia" all the way.
 

Terry S.

Quaestor
Staff member
With the re-sizing of decimal coinage, I believe all pre-decimal coins were withdrawn from circulation.
 

Quasus

Civis Illustris
Dixerim illud potius esse rex Aragonũ quam rex Aragonis, praecipue si finis lineae ad s finale nominis Alfonsus comparatur. Regnum ipse Aragonia appellabatur, de incolis ejus incertus sum, utrum Aragones essent, necne. Praeterea, antiquitus mos erat dicere rex talis nationis, ut rex Francorum.
 

scrabulista

Consul
Staff member
Aragonũ - was this a medieval genitive or something?
 

Quasus

Civis Illustris
Esset genitivus pluralis tertiae declinationis Aragonum. Litterae m et n saepissime omittebantur, quod notâ super vocalem positâ indicabatur.
 
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