Next Chapter / New beginning / Fresh start / Starting over

Stian Jacobsen

New Member
I want an tattoo symbolising a new start in my life. I really like latin words, because of the way they sound, it's like speaking art! Any phrases or single words that can describe this?
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
Many possibilities here.

Novum principium
Novum initium
Novum exordium
Novum primordium
 

Ignis Umbra

Ignis Aeternus
For Stian' sake, those all roughly translate to the same thing: "New beginning".
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
Uh, no, hadn't thought of that. It just happens that they're all neuter, lol.
 

Callaina

Feles Curiosissima
Not only that, but unless I'm totally scanning these wrong, "exordium" and "primordium" are both stressed (and therefore rhyme) on the penult...yes? :D
 

Ignis Umbra

Ignis Aeternus
Not on the penult, but on the syllable before it.
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
Nope. Antepenult. They're divided thus: pri-mor-di-um, ex-or-di-um.
 

Ignis Umbra

Ignis Aeternus
Ah that's the word I was searching for: antepenult.
 

Callaina

Feles Curiosissima
LOL, that's what I meant. I honestly have no clue what I was thinking when I said penult...grrr...mea culpa...

But I was right: they do rhyme! :)
 

AL II FL

New Member
  • primordium only means "first beginning" so it would be paradox combined with novum in my opinion
  • exordium is litteraly the beginning of tissue (of a toga etc.) and used for the beginning of a speech and a few other exceptions (beginning of all things)
  • principium is ~a seed/an origin of sth (like war) or refering to the first one in terms of number (so the first person of the state is princeps, or the first row in military formations - but you would imagine it as really having something to count in front of your eyes, so this would also be a bit paradox with novum as it doesn't imply the starting over, the fact that this first position ever changes, it's a given fact, a count... If anything maybe changing the first man, first row etc. like replacing it maybe, if you get what I mean. If you'd take this as a new start in your life it would kind of imply that you delete everything that has ever happened before, like you're reborn) --> so maybe one could resume this as meaning more "the first one" than "beginning"
  • initium from "going into something" seems closest

If you ask me, synonyms don't exist - at least not in the way we today understand them. As the word synonym suggests, it's more like "having a meaning in common" but not "the same". Language is no place for twins ;)
 

Ater Gladius

Civis Illustris
  • primordium only means "first beginning" so it would be paradox combined with novum in my opinion
  • exordium is litteraly the beginning of tissue (of a toga etc.) and used for the beginning of a speech and a few other exceptions (beginning of all things)
  • principium is ~a seed/an origin of sth (like war) or refering to the first one in terms of number (so the first person of the state is princeps, or the first row in military formations - but you would imagine it as really having something to count in front of your eyes, so this would also be a bit paradox with novum as it doesn't imply the starting over, the fact that this first position ever changes, it's a given fact, a count... If anything maybe changing the first man, first row etc. like replacing it maybe, if you get what I mean. If you'd take this as a new start in your life it would kind of imply that you delete everything that has ever happened before, like you're reborn) --> so maybe one could resume this as meaning more "the first one" than "beginning"
  • initium from "going into something" seems closest
If you ask me, synonyms don't exist - at least not in the way we today understand them. As the word synonym suggests, it's more like "having a meaning in common" but not "the same". Language is no place for twins ;)
With your logic, then, the titular phrase "new beginning" is also wrong since you can't have an "old beginning" or "former beginning". "Fresh start" is also redundant since in every "start", we start anew; when it is not starting anew, we call it "resumption" instead. You know that words have transferred meanings, right?

Perhaps the OP has been through a lot of grim tragedy and wanted to start afresh, and he perhaps really need some extra pleonasm to encourage himself.

And if the OP has already tattooed the phrase, when he sees this post, he's gonna have trauma.
 

scrabulista

Consul
Staff member
If you like Lawyer Latin, there's de novo
 
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