Online dictionary with pronunciation, other than wiktionary?

bubo bubo

New Member
As wiktionary is blocked in my region, I'm looking for an online latin dictionry with pronunciation of the word.
 

LCF

One of "those" people
Well. The good thing about Latin is that it sounds as it is written. Almost every dictionary you can get a hold of will have long and short vowels marked.
 

Quasus

Civis Illustris
For a more accurate indication of vowel length, you can consult Gaffiot 16 on https://logeion.uchicago.edu. Aside from that, deviations from spelling are minimal. The letter u is read [w] in words like suavis ['swa:vis], suadeo ['swa:deo:] and in ngu + vowel: lingua ['liŋgwa]. The letters -gn- are read [ŋn]: magnus ['maŋnus]. J is doubled between vowels: major [majjor].
 

bubo bubo

New Member
Thanks, Quasus. The dictionary looks great. I notice that there are short vowels, normal-lengthed vowels, and long vowels. I've read that the stress falls on the penultimate syllable, unless that syllable contains a short vowel, in which case the stress falls on the antepenultimate syllable. Is that correct?
 

LCF

One of "those" people
Remember that it's not just about vowels but the length of the syllable.
 

LCF

One of "those" people
Good. Search for latin stress and pronunciation. You should be able to hit a few pages.
 

Quasus

Civis Illustris
Is there a list of common irregularly stressed (antepenultimate stress) words?
Antepenultimate stress is regular. It's all about syllable quantity. There are a few words with the last syllable stressed, though: illīc (< illīce), addūc (< addūce). They are also irregular in being polysyllabic and having a long vowel in the closed last syllable. (Normally, in polysyllabic words vowels are shortened before any single final consonant except -s: ōrnās but ōrnăt; also cf. sōl (monosyllabic), rēx (two consonants).) (Sorry if it sounds like the rules of fizzbin, actually everything is quite simple.)

I notice that there are short vowels, normal-lengthed vowels, and long vowels.
Vowels are either long or short, there is no third grade of length. The conventions of dictionaries vary. Many of them just don't care about vowel length in closed syllables, e. g. Lewis & Short. Gaffiot 2016 correctly indicates long vowels in quīntus, etc.; so probably one should presume that unmarked vowels are short. This is not quite consistent, but nothing doing.
 

Quasus

Civis Illustris
Is this about the "ae", "oe"? Does consonant also affect the length of the syllable?
For simplicity, you could adopt Allen's terminology. A vowel is either long or short. This property is called the length of the vowel. A syllable is called light if it ends in a short vowel and heavy otherwise. This property is called the quantity of the syllable. Thus, you have six very clear terms and you can translate into them any obscure stuff like "vowel long by position" (which is not about vowels nor about length), etc. Just remember that vowels have length and syllables have quantity.
 

Quasus

Civis Illustris
Actually, I think only one thing is essential: if you care about vowel length, learn it from the very beginning. If you don't, you'll hardly force yourself to relearn all the vocabulary afterwards. :)
 

bubo bubo

New Member
Thanks, Quasus. Your posts explained it very well. It doesn't look very complicated now. I'll learn it from the beginning.
 
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