Oratio obliqua

Symposion

Active Member
There is only one Latin, since at least the time of Cicero.
Already in Tacitus you see that he of course have Cicero as a foundation and even archaic forms but the interesting aspects are that he is not Classical Latin but uses already some later forms of Latin that is not typical Cicero Classical Latin.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
There are differences across all periods and authors. But the basis is largely the same. Learn that basis first and the rest will follow.
 

Symposion

Active Member
There are differences across all periods and authors. But the basis is largely the same. Learn that basis first and the rest will follow.
I agree and I have learnt the basics. I understand the AcI construction basics at the same time I might comment in class tomorrow that why is Oratio obliqua not dealt with in Basic studies as the teacher wrote but only now at the end of BA studies. In the studies of Latin we need to also look at style and that is much dealt with especially in MA studies of Latin.
 

Quasus

Civis Illustris
Out of sporting interest, would you have a crack at VI:22? Remember, meaning first. So you could translate it for starters, if that's the only way you can get at the meaning. Also remember that translation is no mechanic substitution. Two phases are involved: (1) you grasp the meaning of the text to translate; (2) you adequately render it in the target language. Actually, for this assignment you don't need phase (2), but you should be able to explain what's going on.
 
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