Perfect as relative time?

Clemens

Civis Illustris

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Personally, I can't stand the NO. It's a hotch-potch of half-baked ideas, outdated scholarship and 60s zeitgeist. How a bunch of "experts" thought they could top nearly two thousand years worth of tradition, sanctity and genius in only four years of the 1960s is well beyond my comprehension.
You certainly have a point, although some of the changes were in the works for a long time. Fortescue, for example, pointed out that the canon was oddly redacted. Others questioned the necessity of all the signs of the cross made over the bread and wine, or found it incongruous that the Introit was no longer the beginning of the mass. Another issue was that many of not most Sundays were superseded by saints’ days, although I think John XXIII changed that when he changed the ranking system of feasts and Sundays (before the bigger changes of 1970).
 
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EstQuodFulmineIungo

Civis Illustris

  • Civis Illustris

laity making responses
I don't understand this. You mean the minister would say "sursum corda" and receive no response, only an uncomfortable silence before the Vat II?

frequent communion
This one is only due to the fact people receives communion even when they haven't confessed recently. Here the doctrine divides, and yes, after the Vat. II the mainstream suggest the equation 1mass=1 particle.
 

Clemens

Civis Illustris

  • Civis Illustris

I don't understand this. You mean the minister would say "sursum corda" and receive no response, only an uncomfortable silence before the Vat II?


This one is only due to the fact people receives communion even when they haven't confessed recently. Here the doctrine divides, and yes, after the Vat. II the mainstream suggest the equation 1mass=1 particle.
For responses, at a low mass, the altar server made the responses. At a solemn mass, the deacon and subdeacon made them (depending on which response). Laity began to be encouraged to make some of the responses not at Vatican II, but starting around the time of Pius X or so.

When I say frequent communion, I don’t meant today’s practice only. Again, starting with Pius X, laity were encouraged to receive as often as possible (after confession, as you say). Prior to that, the norm was to communicate very infrequently. Many people only did so once a year.
 
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