Progress through the struggle

Jdub

New Member
Overcome pain/torture/torment
Progress through the struggle

The intended purpose of this translation is to be a personal mantra that will go on a logo in my gym and possibly as a tattoo as well. I’ve dealt with chronic pain that has tortured me over the last 14yrs and occasionally becomes excruciatingly debilitating. I would like to stick with a form of cruciatus over dolor.

[machine drivel snipped]

Would that work as two separate phrases, and if it were combined as one phrase (progress or push through the struggle to overcome the pain) what would that be?
 
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Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Hello,

Supera cruciatum = "Overcome the torture/torment."

Progredere per labores = "Progress through the struggles/hardships*."

Progredere per labores ut cruciatum superes = "Progress through the hardships to overcome the torture/torment."

*I'm not sure a totally literal translation of "struggle" would work all that well in Latin. Labores, often translated as "hardships", is the plural of a word that can also mean "work, toil, labor", so it can be argued that, like "struggle", it has active implications.
 

Jdub

New Member
I privately refer to my condition as my eternal struggle; along the line of struggle for/of existence. Certamen is what I see most often. Would that not be correct?
 

EstQuodFulmineIungo

Civis Illustris
I privately refer to my condition as my eternal struggle; along the line of struggle for/of existence. Certamen is what I see most often. Would that not be correct?
Yes, it's right. In the Vulgate there's also "colluctatio" and "tribulatio" (acc. "colluctationem", "tribulationem")
 

Jdub

New Member
Thank you for confirming that certamen would work.
So as it stands, my two phrase translation would be:

Supera cruciatum
Progredere per certamen

Correct?

Lastly, is it possible to shorten the second phrase by removing “per,” so “progredere certamen,” or would that not make sense / change the meaning?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Thank you for confirming that certamen would work.
Certamen means something more like a contest. I don't think that's your intended meaning, is it?
Lastly, is it possible to shorten the second phrase by removing “per,” so “progredere certamen,” or would that not make sense / change the meaning?
That would not make sense.
 

Jdub

New Member
Certamen means something more like a contest. I don't think that's your intended meaning, is it?
It is not. I see that now after using the word search function on this site.
In the Vulgate there's also "colluctatio" and "tribulatio" (acc. "colluctationem", "tribulationem")
I was trying to avoid using tribulation for this, but that is the word used in the vulgate for Rom 5:3. Suffering and distress would be good ways to describe my current state, so I guess I shouldn’t mind using it.

So then it would be Progredere per tribulationem?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Let me still remind you of my initial translation, labores. It's defined as struggles through difficulties, hardships. It seems to me that it fits the context well enough.
 
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