Psallite sapienter - Sacred music

Gregorius Textor

Civis Illustris
It's difficult to find recordings at all of those chants. Over time a lot of traditions have been terminated.

Thank you for John's proemium. Catherine Emmerick foresaw a time of great tribulation when ceremonies would be shortened of that last part of capital importance... Looks like she prophesied correctly.
About the time when "ceremonies would be shortened of that last part of capital importance" -- are you referring to the Last Gospel at the end of mass? Not the disappearance of chant traditions?
 

Agrippa

Civis Illustris

Αγνή Παρθένε Δέσποινα,

Άχραντε Θεοτόκε,

Παρθένε Μήτηρ Άνασσα,

Πανένδροσέ τε πόκε.

O pure and virgin Lady,

O spotless Theotokos

O Virgin Queen and Mother

O dewy fleece most sacred.
 

Gregorius Textor

Civis Illustris
Alleluia for the Feast of Transfiguration, this Friday, Aug. 6 (3 1/2 minutes)

"Alleluia. Candor est lucis aeternae, speculum sine macula, et imago bonitatis illius." (He is the splendour of eternal light, an unspotted mirror and the image of His goodness. Wisdom 7:26)

 

EstQuodFulmineIungo

Auditor et Discipulus


Attende Domine, et miserere, quia peccavimus tibi.
Ad te Rex summe,
omnium Redemptor,
oculos nostros
sublevamus flentes:
exaudi, Christe,
supplicantum preces.
Attende Domine, et miserere, quia peccavimus tibi.
Dextera Patris,
lapis angularis,
via salutis,
ianua caelestis,
ablue nostri
maculas delicti.
Attende Domine, et miserere, quia peccavimus tibi.
Rogamus, Deus,
tuam maiestatem:
auribus sacris
gemitus exaudi:
crimina nostra
placidus indulge.
Attende Domine, et miserere, quia peccavimus tibi.
Tibi fatemur
crimina admissa:
contrito corde
pandimus occulta:
tua, Redemptor,
pietas ignoscat.
Attende Domine, et miserere, quia peccavimus tibi.
Innocens captus,
nec repugnans ductus;
testibus falsis
pro impiis damnatus
quos redemisti,
tu conserva, Christe.
Attende Domine, et miserere, quia peccavimus tibi.
 

Gregorius Textor

Civis Illustris
Huc sunt pauca sed matura verba pronuntiatione ecclesiastica lecta/dicta de rebus teologiae et de quibusdam aliis.
I don't know which is scarier -- the number of words of this that I understood, on first hearing, or the number of sentences I didn't understand.o_O
He speaks expressively, and that helps.

But, I would like to know -- is this the Roman pronunciation that the Church recommends?
 

Terry S.

Quaestor
Staff member
It sounds to me more like the Italianate ecclesiastical pronunciation.
 

kylefoley202

New Member
Is it possible to post this list on Wikipedia? I don't want to recommend something that has already been recommended.
 

Gregorius Textor

Civis Illustris
Is it possible to post this list on Wikipedia? I don't want to recommend something that has already been recommended.
Are you asking permission to share the list of chants and songs in this thread, by putting them onto a page in Wikipedia? Or what?
 

Gregorius Textor

Civis Illustris
Stephen of Liège, Ad Matutinum: Responsoria: Gloria Patri - Summe Trinitati - Benedicamus Patri et Filio cum Sancto Spiritu (10 minutes).


According to Hello Music Theory, Stephen, was one of the earliest Mediaeval composers whose names we know. Born 850, he was Bishop of Liège 901-920. I learned that "Etienne" is the French form of "Stephen".
 

Gregorius Textor

Civis Illustris
O Virtus Sapientiae -- Hildegard von Bingen (1098-1179).
Three minutes, with text and commentary.

 

EstQuodFulmineIungo

Auditor et Discipulus
But, I would like to know -- is this the Roman pronunciation that the Church recommends?
I don't think there's actually a rule in the CIC about that. As long as we understand each other. But I'm curious What of that guy's pronunciation sounds strange to you? Because if it's the Rs the thing is reciprocal and both pronunciations are acceptable IMHO :D.
I and many other who use the Ecclesiastical pronunciation here (even teachers), often get the "accents" wrong e.g. phrases like these:
... Et iniquitates nostrae abstulerunt nos...
... Domus sanctificationis tuae et gloriae tuae ubi laudaverunt te patres nostri"
and
"et mitte quem missurus es ut auferat ipse jugum captivitatis nostrae"
"noli timere, quare moerore consumeris?"

sometimes are (wrongly) read:
... Et iniquitates nostrae abstulerunt nos...
... Domus sanctificationis tuae et gloriae tuae ubi laudaverunt te patres nostri"
and
"et mitte quem missurus es ut auferat ipse jugum captivitatis nostrae"
"noli timere, quare moerore consumeris?"
I think they get the pronunciation right, though.
 
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