Quid sum? (What am I?) Latin writing game

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member

Terry S.

Quaestor
Staff member
Not trying to detail the thread or anything but " a Christo nato computantur" has confused the life out of me. Is it similar to "ab urbe condita"? If it is can such a phrase be formed from the deponent participle "nato"?
Your name is a misnomer, sir. You appear to me to have more than a few scoobies about Latin. Welcome to the forum!
 

john abshire

Well-Known Member
Unus eorum sum qui a Christo nato computantur. Meo in cursu clades incolis cuiusdam insulae accidit, propter quam eorum lingua quasi infecta est. Quid sum?
I don’t think I am close, but here goes (trying to translate).
I am one of theirs who is reckoned together by Christ(‘s) birth. In my (running) motion, he hacked out destruction to the inhabitants of certain islands, just as (as if) the language of theirs was being worked in. What/who am I?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
of theirs
Of them.
who is reckoned
Are reckoned: computantur is plural.

Also, in context it's actually "which" rather than "who", but I guess you couldn't tell that without knowing the answer to the riddle.
Unnecessary word.
From.
In my (running) motion
In context more like "in my course".
he hacked out destruction to the inhabitants of certain islands
"a disaster (clades) happened (accidit) to the inhabitants (incolis) of a certain island (cuiusdam insulae — this is singular)"
just as (as if) the language of theirs was being worked in.
"because of which (propter quam) their (eorum) language (lingua) was as though (i.e. so to speak) infected/corrupted (quasi infecta est)"
What/who am I?
"What", not "who". "Who" is quis.
 

john abshire

Well-Known Member
Unus eorum sum qui a Christo nato computantur. Meo in cursu clades incolis cuiusdam insulae accidit, propter quam eorum lingua quasi infecta est. Quid sum?
Why not Christi nato?
Propter quam;
because of which (on account of which?) Is it the same? I have propter=“on account of”; and quam = which (+ a lot of other meanings). The question is; do you come up with “because of which” from propter quam , or is it propter = “because of” , and quam = “which”. Does propter ille” = “because of that”?
 
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Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Nato is a perfect participle meaning "(having been) born" referring to Christo.

A Christo nato = from Christ having been born = from the birth of Christ
Post Christum natum = after Christ having been born = after the birth of Christ
Ab Urbe Condita = from the city having been founded = from the foundation of the city
Ante urbem conditam = before the city having been founded = before the foundation of the city

Those aren't the only such phrases you can use, of course. You can potentially do the same with any noun and past participle.
 

john abshire

Well-Known Member
Nato is a perfect participle meaning "(having been) born" referring to Christo.

A Christo nato = from Christ having been born = from the birth of Christ
Post Christum natum = after Christ having been born = after the birth of Christ
Ab Urbe Condita = from the city having been founded = from the foundation of the city
Ante urbem conditam = before the city having been founded = before the foundation of the city

Those aren't the only such phrases you can use, of course. You can potentially do the same with any noun and past participle.
Nato = perfect participle makes a lot of sense. I somehow thought nato was a noun. Thank you for the examples. They help a lot.
 

john abshire

Well-Known Member
Unus eorum sum qui a Christo nato computantur. Meo in cursu clades incolis cuiusdam insulae accidit, propter quam eorum lingua quasi infecta est. Quid sum?
Propter quam
Quam = which, accusative, feminine, singular of qui, quae, quod?
I have qui, quae, quod relative pronouns. What type of pronoun is this in propter quam ?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
No. The riddle has already been answered here.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
No. It was Bitmap's turn, but the floor is open now.
 

Agrippa

Civis Illustris
Videris esse, ut opinor, Beta vulgaris, quae Anglice beetroot appellatur.
:rolleyes1:
 

john abshire

Well-Known Member
Videris esse, ut opinor, Beta vulgaris, quae Anglice beetroot appellatur.
:rolleyes1:
“You seem to be, I believe, beta vulgaris, (the ordinary beet), which in English is called beetroot.”
is my translation correct?
No, I am not a beet.
The rules are that the guesses (your replies) are supposed to be in English. (But, if I can translate well enough, it gives me more practice, and I am glad to get it.)
 

Agrippa

Civis Illustris
Correct translation! You got more practice.:clapping:
 
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