Mediaeval Quoniam autem miraculose praedicta

Big Ups

Member

Hi All, thanks for any help offered. The quoniam is throwing me off. I can't seem to find a translation that works as a complete sentence.

Quoniam autem miraculose praedicta ab angelis bonis fieri possibile sit, neminem qui Scripturas legerit ambigere suspicor.

But, since it is possible that miraculously foretold [events] are given by good angels, I suppose no one who reads the scriptures to dispute;

But, since no one who reads the scriptures, I suppose, to dispute that it is possible that miraculously foretold [events] are given by good angels;
 

Big Ups

Member

How does this rendering look?
But I suppose that no one who reads the scriptures to doubt that it is possible that miraculously foretold [events] are given by good angels.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patrona

I suppose that no one who reads the scriptures to doubt
Check your construction here. It doesn't really cohere, does it?

Also mind the tense of legerit.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patrona

That's better, but it's "no one who has read the Scriptures".
 

Big Ups

Member

Thanks. For a verb like Legerit (Perfect Active Subjunctive), how does one know when to emphasize the "potential" aspect of the subjunctive? Is it assumed here? Could this also be translated as "no one who would have read the Scriptures"?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patrona

The subjunctive is used here just because the clause depends on indirect speech. That's a classical Latin rule. English will use the simple indicative in the same context.

If this subjunctive were to be taken as potential, you'd expect the larger context to suggest such an interpretation, which it doesn't here.
 

limetrees

Civis Illustris

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patronus

How does this rendering look?
But I suppose that no one who reads the scriptures to doubt that it is possible that miraculously foretold [events] are given by good angels.
Should it be rather "are done/performed by good angels"?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patrona

Yes, "are done" or "are performed" would be a better verb than "are given".
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patrona

In fact, I have now seen the larger context of this sentence and it seems to be more about angels foretelling things than about them realizing predictions.
 
Top