scătĕbra etymology

Przibram

Member
Hi, I am looking for clues about the Latin word scătĕbra (gush, fountain), particularly about its suffix -bra. Does the Latin suffix -bra have a meaning?

Any advice is welcome

PZ
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
there's also scatet erroribus :D
"overflowing with errors"
 

Agrippa

Civis Illustris
It seems to be a noun suffix denoting instrument, vessel/place or a person (very rare).
...
Cf.
latebra hiding place / lateo to be hidden
salebra jolting place / salio to spring
dolabra pickaxe / dolo to chip with an axe
&c&c.
 

Agrippa

Civis Illustris
Cf. dolabra > diminutive dolabella small pickaxe / P. Cornelius Dolabella Cicero's son-in-law.
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
illecebra also comes to mind
 

Anbrutal Russicus

Active Member
It's a regular variant of the suffix -blo- (vestībulum), itself a variant of -tro-, tlo- (arātrum, titulus), with -tlo- giving a further variant -clo-/-cro- (novācula, simulācrum), all exhibiting the the R-L dissimilation: pick /l/ if there's an /r/ in the stem and vice versa.
 

Michael Zwingli

Active Member
It's a regular variant of the suffix -blo- (vestībulum), itself a variant of -tro-, tlo- (arātrum, titulus), with -tlo- giving a further variant -clo-/-cro- (novācula, simulācrum), all exhibiting the the R-L dissimilation: pick /l/ if there's an /r/ in the stem and vice versa.
It seems that if you go far enough back, Latin -bra, -brum, and -trum, as well as Greek -tron (as in to arotron, "a plow") are all related as instrumental suffixes, coming from alternate forms (one with the voiced initial, one with unvoiced) of the same IE instrumental suffix.
 
It seems possible that the semantics of the 'place words' listed above may be due in part to tenebra(e), which is sort of a 'dark place.' It exhibits the regular, if weird, Latin reflex of -sr-. Cf. affixed s-stems like muliebris, lūgubris (< *lūgus).
 
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