Mediaeval straw to snakes

Big Ups

Member

Thank you for any comments on my translation.

Nec negavit Guillelmus Parisiensis et Bonaventura fieri naturaliter
ut festucae omnes aulae unius vel camerae serpentes appareant;
innumeraque talia fiunt per quae potest magica naturalis exerceri. Ad
quae omnia similiter aut mirabilius agenda valet angelorum virtus,
quos naturae secretas vires cognoscere limpidius constat et applicare
posse velocius. Nonnunquam vero sic visiva virtus vel objectorum
exteriorum radiatio suspenditur per angelos ut homo praesentata
oculis non aspiciat. Patuit in illis qui in domum Lot irruere et in aliis

Nor did William of Paris and Bonaventure deny that it happens naturally that all the straws of some yard or roof appear to be serpents; Natural magic can be practiced through the happenings of countless such instances (lit. and countless such instances happen through which natural magic can be practiced). Toward which, the power of angels succeeds in all things that must be done similarly or miraculously. It is evident that they [i.e., angels] clearly know the secret powers of nature and are able to apply them swiftly. Sometimes, in truth, the visual power or radiation of exterior objects is suspended by angels so that a man might not see what is shown to his eyes.
 

Laurentius

Civis Illustris

  • Civis Illustris

Apart from all the comparatives of the text, I think this is the only sentence you got wrong:
Toward which, the power of angels succeeds in all things that must be done similarly or miraculously.
Camera maybe better to say vault, idk.
 

Big Ups

Member

Thank you. How about the following: toward all such things that must be done, the power of angels succeeds similarly or miraculously.
 

Laurentius

Civis Illustris

  • Civis Illustris

Not yet, the adverbs modify agenda and you still didn't render the compararive in English as a comparative for some reason. Also mirabiliter doesn't mean miraculously.
 

Laurentius

Civis Illustris

  • Civis Illustris

Feel free to post the translation if you want to be sure.
 

Big Ups

Member

How about this: Toward all such things that must be done similarly or more wonderously, the power of angles succeeds
 

Laurentius

Civis Illustris

  • Civis Illustris

How about this: Toward all such things that must be done similarly or more wonderously, the power of angles succeeds
I would say "is effective" instead of "succeeds" because it sounds better in English but yes, it's ok. Remember to correct limpidius and velocious too like you did with wonderously. Also, about that, limpidius modifies cognoscere like velocious modifies applicare.
 

Big Ups

Member

Yes, thank you. I translated them like this: "it is evident that they [i.e., angels] know the secret powers of nature more clearly and are able to apply them more swiftly." I was translating comparatives as adverbs because my text noted adverbs with an accent grave. See below. I don't know the function of this accent in these older printings but apparently, they indicate a number of parts of speech: adverbs, comparatives, and some prepositions

Let me ask you about "agenda." As a gerundive, I know it expresses necessity, obligation or propriety, but my translation of "that must be done" seems clunky in English. Can I render the sentence in the following way: "The power of angels is effective in all such things done similarly or more wonderously."

 

Laurentius

Civis Illustris

  • Civis Illustris

Yes, thank you. I translated them like this: "it is evident that they [i.e., angels] know the secret powers of nature more clearly and are able to apply them more swiftly." I was translating comparatives as adverbs because my text noted adverbs with an accent grave. See below. I don't know the function of this accent in these older printings but apparently, they indicate a number of parts of speech: adverbs, comparatives, and some prepositions
Seems fine but I'd translate cognoscere with understand, perceive or something like that here, to know is more of a meaning that the verb has in perfect tenses.
Let me ask you about "agenda." As a gerundive, I know it expresses necessity, obligation or propriety, but my translation of "that must be done" seems clunky in English. Can I render the sentence in the following way: "The power of angels is effective in all such things done similarly or more wonderously."

It didn't seem clunky to me but I am not a native speaker, what if you use ought?
 
Top