Symbols

Michael Zwingli

Active Member
No, they aren't. The word refers to the first five books of the Torah in printed form.
I didn't know that myself, but that is very true! Chumash in general refers to a printed Torah, as opposed to a Sefer Torah, which is the scribally-transcribed (is that a redundancy?) Torah scroll. The Chumashim (singular Chumash) with which I am familiar from the times that I have attended prayer services at the synagogues of friends and acquaintances, is separated into weekly "Torah portions", called parashas in, I believe, Hebrew (sometimes when you are dealing with Orthodox Judaism, it is difficult to be certain whether the terminology being used is Hebrew or Yiddish in origin) for each week of the year. Each parasha contains prayers and readings from the Torah/Pentateuch, the quasi-historical books just following the Pentateuch (the Hebrew name of which I forget), and the books of the prophets (if I remember right, collectively called Nevi'im, plural of Navi "prophet", in Hebrew). In a similar way, the Roman Catholic Missal has readings from the "Old Testament", from the Pauline Epistles, and from the Gospels, for each day or week of the year (depending on whether you are looking at a daily or Sunday Missal). It is in this capacity as a prescribed weekly prayer book that I likened the Chumash to the Roman Missal which I grew up using.
 
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Michael Zwingli

Active Member
Well, Agrippa never said that YHWH is literally supposed to be pronounced as Adonai, he just said it is pronounced that way.
Yes...I noticed that Agrippa's short statement could be read a couple of ways...that he might indeed, have meant that Adonai is pronounced in substitution for the name of God. I just wanted to explicitly clarify the matter for those who might have thought that the four letters shown in the Huguenot seal, once vowel points are added, is actually to be pronounced "Adonai" as either a lexeme or a proper name.
 
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Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
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Seal of Shema. It says:

,

lshm’, ‘bd yrb’m

(Belonging) to Shema, servant of Jeroboam.
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
Jeroboam II, to be clear.
 

Michael Zwingli

Active Member
Since we seem to be on a bit of a Hebrew jag at the moment, see the arms of Yale University, which bear a Hebrew motto and that motto's functional translation (as opposed to literal translation) into Latin:


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The Hebrew script shows the words Urim v' Thumim, which according to Exodus 28:30 were inscribed upon the breastplate of the high priest of Israel: "And thou shalt put in the breastplate of judgment the Urim and the Thummim; and they shall be upon Aaron's heart, when he goeth in before the Lord: and Aaron shall bear the judgment of the children of Israel upon his heart before the Lord continually." The term Aaron in the context of this passage refers not only to the brother of Moses, but to the entirety of the Aaronic high-priesthood. Urim v' Thumim literally translate into something like "revelations and perfections", but the creator of Yale's arms used a more functionally equivalent translation of "light and truth", which by European heraldic custom was rendered in Latin upon a scroll below the escutcheon bearing the armorial symbols.

Somewhat interestingly, the choice of Yale to bear an essentially Hebrew device upon its arms did not prevent the university, which, like Harvard, has historically been at its core an Anglo-Saxon cultural bastion, from long being somewhat loath to admit what it viewed as "too many" Jews as matriculating students. An interesting account of the history of this may be read about in the book "Joining the Club: A history of Jews and Yale", by Dan A. Oren, published by Yale University Press.
 
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Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
I mean, worshipping a Jewish man as god didn’t stop Christians from persecuting Jews, for example.
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
B692678A-ADD5-4A46-B514-8AD8F2965616.png


Seal of Muhammad.
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
It looks embossed almost. Is this the impression made or the seal?
I’m not sure, but I think the seal is actually made that way. I suppose you could compare it to other versions.

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EstQuodFulmineIungo

Civis Illustris
I can't find the actual dimention of the seal on the web. If the seal were large enough it might have been casted. In that case the that's probably where the metal was poured in the mould.

If the seal is little, as I think it is, there's a chance that could be just an imperfection of the die that left that mark during the coinage.
Although, that would be strange, because normally the die breakes in the center, where there's the maximum strain.
So, it's just a guess.
 

EstQuodFulmineIungo

Civis Illustris
It might be made on purpose and have some meaning, I don't rule that option off.


I’m not sure, but I think the seal is actually made that way. I suppose you could compare it to other versions.

View attachment 14386


View attachment 14387
but if you look at that two pictures they both have they same problem, the first one it's oddly shaped in that corner too, it isn't even oval. I think it's related with the poor technology available at the time.
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
:think:
 
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