the blood of heroes never dies

Scotty1987

New Member
This is from a logo related to POW/MIA and the POW/MIA flag covers the center portion of a Latin phrase beginning with MORITU and ends with AMUS. I wasn't able to determine the ending of MORITU or the beginjing of AMUS. The English above and below the logo says "THE BLOOD OF HEROES NEVER DIES"
Any ideas? I need this for the art work for a leather wallet and leather sign.
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
one possibility
heroum sanguis moritur nunquam
 

Arca Defectionis

Civis Illustris
I'm not sure we have an excellent word for "hero," since heros has a mythological flavor... maybe simply virorum would be the more classical translation, if somewhat sexist - my dictionary lists vir as a translation for hero, as does Whitaker.

The English on the logo was almost certainly not a literal translation of the Latin.
 

Laurentius

Civis Illustris
Maybe the Latin could have been something like "morituri... salutamus", don't know.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I'm not sure we have an excellent word for "hero," since heros has a mythological flavor... maybe simply virorum would be the more classical translation, if somewhat sexist - my dictionary lists vir as a translation for hero, as does Whitaker.
You're the second one these days to advocate for vir as "hero", but I'm still really not convinced. It basically means nothing more than "man" (first definition in L&S "a male person, a man"), or at best in some contexts "true man" (4th def. L&S: "a man, a man of courage, principle, or honor, one who deserves the name of a man") as can also the English "man". Heros indeed is initially mythological, but according to L&S, Cicero used the word figuratively to speak of "illustrious men".

But anyway, welcome back! :) It's been a while.
 

Arca Defectionis

Civis Illustris
You're the second one these days to advocate for vir as "hero", but I'm still really not convinced. It basically means nothing more than "man" (first definition in L&S "a male person, a man"), or at best in some contexts "true man" (4th def. L&S: "a man, a man of courage, principle, or honor, one who deserves the name of a man") as can also the English "man". Heros indeed is initially mythological, but according to L&S, Cicero used the word figuratively to speak of "illustrious men".

But anyway, welcome back! :) It's been a while.

It's true that simply saying sanguis virorum numquam moritur would sound closer to pseudoscience than a tribute to heroism; "illustrious men" is not really what is meant here either (heroes on the battlefield) - I'm tempted to give some sort of cop-out periphrastic answer (like fortium or audacium or magnanimorum) - though that doesn't really capture the OP's intended sense...

And it's great to be back! You and several of the old crowd are active as ever I see :)
 

Ater Gladius

Civis Illustris
If the OP is talking about this, then morituri te salutamus is perhaps the only thing that fits in.

And by the way, I think most "illustrious men," as referred by Cicero, would have marched in a Roman legion at some point in their lives.
 

Laurentius

Civis Illustris
If the OP is talking about this, then morituri te salutamus is perhaps the only thing that fits in.

And by the way, I think most "illustrious men," as referred by Cicero, would have marched in a Roman legion at some point in their lives.
Oh I saw that logo too, but didn't notice the Latin writing! Maybe there could be vos too? Don't know.
 
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