The name Stasimachus in Greek

limetrees

Civis Illustris
There is character called Stasimachus in Poullain de la Barre's De l'éducation des dames pour la conduite de l'esprit dans les sciences et dans les mœurs,

Am I right that just on the Greek etymology, "Stasimachus" is he who struggles against the status quo?
The problem is that "stasis" in Greek is a standing, position, station, but is also a sedition a discord.

He is calling for something fairly radical in the text, but adopts a softly, softly approach about it at the same time, so either could be right.
Does anyone with good Greek have opinions based just on the Greek name?

EDIT
Looking again, I see that Thrasymachus (of Plato's Republic - misunderstood, I think, as calling for 'might is right', when in fact he is just stating the political realities - but he is certainly hot-headed) is given Liddell and Scott as "bold in battle", so would Stasimachus by "standing in battle"?

Thanks.
 

limetrees

Civis Illustris
Thanks for this.
In fact, going back and looking at the text again, Poullain describes Stasimachus (Stasimaque in the French) as the peacemaker, the enemy of division (just as Eulalia in the text, for example, is the lady who speaks well). It seems like he's taking the Greek to mean "makes war on discord". Can that be right?

(Obviously, Poullain's understanding is what counts for how one reads the character thereafter, but just on the Greek, is he right?)
I appreciate the help.

http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k83722k/f16.image
 

Aurifex

Aedilis
Staff member
Thanks for this.
In fact, going back and looking at the text again, Poullain describes Stasimachus (Stasimaque in the French) as the peacemaker, the enemy of division (just as Eulalia in the text, for example, is the lady who speaks well). It seems like he's taking the Greek to mean "makes war on discord". Can that be right?

(Obviously, Poullain's understanding is what counts for how one reads the character thereafter, but just on the Greek, is he right?)
I appreciate the help.
I think he's probably entitled to make the word mean "fighting with discord".

In adjectives at least, the -μαχος component can assume various functions:

direct object of verbal prefix - ἀερσίμαχος -"rousing the fight".

verbal with adverbial prefix - ἀλκίμαχος "bravely fighting"; ἀριστόμαχος "best at fighting".

verbal governing direct object prefix- θεόμαχος "fighting God"; σκιάμαχος "fighting shadows".



I'm not sure to what extent we can say Poullain's onomastic caprice is sanctioned by actual Greek precedents, though. The only parallels from Ancient Greek I can find are: Στασίκρατης, Στάσιππος and Στασίοικος. Possibly the first means "controlling discord", but the logical interpretation of the other two is probably to take Στασί- the same way as Στησί- in Στησίχορος, and assume the prefix is verbal and from ἵστημι, rather than nominal and from στάσις, and the "meanings" are something like "horse-taming or "horse-deploying", and "home-founding" respectively. But I'm entering the realms of guess-work there.

Ed: Something very odd has been happening; despite repeated attempts I've been unable to upload the rest of the message. Hopefully, this re-writing has done the trick.
 
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