Translations for Medical App

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Oh me oh my. I don't know.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I guess forma isn't such a bad idea. One of its definitions in the OLD is "a diagram, map, plan". A graph is a bit like that, isn't it?
 

cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
I was wondering if I could use forma for model, which you might display on a graph.
Just scanning through some of Leibniz but haven't found anything so far.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I was wondering if I could use forma for model, which you might display on a graph.
I'm afraid I know little about graphs, so I may not quite grasp the concept I'm supposed to help translate. What is a model, as opposed to a graph?
 

cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
A model is a mathematical description of what you expect to happen, for example we have models to predict what the plasma concentrations of drug will be at a given time after administration. You can then plot the concentrations on a graph.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I'm sorry, I'm a little stumped.

English "graph" is apparently a "Late 19th century abbreviation of graphic formula", so formula, the diminutive of forma, was used at some point to refer to a graph, if only in English (maybe in modern Latin too, who knows?). But you want forma for "model" rather than "graph", hm...
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
If we go the literal route, I guess we could have exemplar for "model".
 

cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
Vicipaedia has graphicum for graph, although searching for graphicum doesn't seem to give any mathematical hits.
The neolatinlexicon suggests alogrismus for algorithm, which might be another way of approaching model. The word apparently appears in Latham. Algorismus gives more hits in google.
 

cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
Who would have thought it—there doesn't seem to be an entry for plateau in any of the dictionaries. The Neolatinlexicon suggests oropedium, campus editus, planities
Campus editus sounds the most precise, but is a bit long. Where does oropedium come from? I am thinking planities might be the most obvious looking at it.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
In what context is the word "plateau" used in the app? Is it to indicate that the patient's condition has been on a plateau for such and such time, or to specify what the plateau was, or?
 

cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
In this context we are describing the relatively flat part of a respiratory pressure curve.

Plateau.png


What do you think about algorismus? I am sort of hoping that @Quasus will rescue me ;)
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
In this context we are describing the relatively flat part of a respiratory pressure curve.
OK, seeing the picture makes me inclined to think that planities is intuitive enough.
What do you think about algorismus?
I don't really know. :( I'm a little out of my depth with mathematical things.
 

Quasus

Civis Illustris
Very curious. Time to dive into Google Books. (Surely, mathematicians started talking about models long after Gauss. :()
 

Quasus

Civis Illustris
I've skimmed through the beginning of the second part of Euler's Introductio in analysin infinitorum, where he introduces graphs. Somehow, he manages to do without the term "graph". :) He calls them just lineae, like linea, sive recta sive curva, cujus natura a natura functionis pendet/ex functione resultat... Euler is careful not to omit linea before curva, but Gauss uses curva on its own. This is in line with the modern usage of the term curve.

As for the "plateau", my personal proposition not backed up by any authority would be just aequum. It conveys the idea of something flat and is not tied to landscape. E. g. something like summum aequum curvae pressionis respiratoriae. :)

Probably, both algorithmus and algorismus are fine. The term is derived from the name of Al-Khwarizmi. Algorithmus has been attested for centuries, Gauss uses it and it entered modern languages, so personally, I'd opt for it rather than for the latter, more exotic spelling. (Curiously, algarismo is "digit" in Portuguese.)

As for models in the mathematical sense, here we're on our own. I think it's a fairly recent usage. A mathematical mode is not something "exemplary". Probably, the original metaphor is that of a clay or wax model. But the difference is substantial. A clay model is used to produce a sculpture. Mathematical model is not used to produce anything. It's an imperfect representation of reality studied by mathematics. Mathematics itself doesn't go beyond models.

Since the model is a representation, perhaps we can call it simulacrum? Cf. "a computer simulation".
 
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Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Laurentius once proposed larva for "mask".
I remember that. But I don't see why that word, which isn't so common in that sense and specifically means a scary mask (larva = ghost ---> ghost mask, scary mask), should be chosen over the more general persona.
 

Michael Zwingli

Active Member
The first is "Route", as in, "By what route was the drug given". Would via work do you think? The suggested Spanish translation was ruta.
Not sure if you want to stick with extant Latin terminology, which might make this process difficult. Perhaps, if you want to be creative, you could use perdatum, a possible substantivization from a hypothetical perdatus "given through"?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Sounds like splitting hair, to me. ;)
 
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