Translations for Medical App

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Anyway, perdatum would rather mean something like "thoroughly given".
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
And, actually, it would be an etymological doublet of perditum... or an earlier form of it.
 

Michael Zwingli

Active Member
How about secutum, nominalized from secutus, "followed"? After all, English "route" itself ultimately derives from (via) ruptum, a substantivization from ruptus "broken", "burst".
 
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Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
How about secutum, nominalized from secutus, "followed"?
I don't see how that would make any sense.

But again, why spilt hairs here by excogitating something odd and obscure when via works pretty well?
 

Michael Zwingli

Active Member
Okay, no more hair-splitting. Wouldn't meatus have the desired meaning; or perhaps trames? To tell the truth, via is a bit troublesome to me, because I can't get past it meaning "road". Probably just me, though.
 
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Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Maybe that could work, but I'm still for via.
 

Michael Zwingli

Active Member
I have thought for a few minutes about what is bothering me about via, and I think I understand it now. Via refers to a physical path, which is why it most often means "road". When we say "route" pertaining to the administration of medication, however, we are speaking more about the method of administration, than about the physical route alone. For instance: an oral administration of medicine by tablet and an oral administration by sublingual strip would not be considered the same "route" of administration. (These types of difficulties are obviously why the medical field has drawn off of both Latin and Greek for it's base of terminology.) That is why I am seeking something different for your consideration. Going off of "method", then, how about modus, or perhaps the ablative thereof, modo, meaning "by the method", "in the manner"?
 
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Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
There are plenty of figurative uses of via.
 

cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
I've skimmed through the beginning of the second part of Euler's Introductio in analysin infinitorum, where he introduces graphs.
Thanks Quase. Very nice suggestions :)
 

Godmy

Sīmia Illūstris
Anyway, perdatum would rather mean something like "thoroughly given".
We've got that one in Czech: dát = dare; předat = per +dare .. and it means here "to give something unwillingly in a surplus [often used sarcastistically]": "Dal mi jenom dvě. Aby se nepředal!" = he gave me just two. I sincerely-hope he hadn't "overgiven" himself [that scoundrel]!" <- really difficult to render it in English :D
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
We've got that one in Czech: dát = dare; předat = per +dare .. and it means here "to give something unwillingly in a surplus [often used sarcastistically]": "Dal mi jenom dvě. Aby se nepředal!" = he gave me just two. I sincerely-hope he hadn't "overgiven" himself [that scoundrel]!" <- really difficult to render it in English :D
That's great.
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
We've got that one in Czech: dát = dare; předat = per +dare .. and it means here "to give something unwillingly in a surplus [often used sarcastistically]": "Dal mi jenom dvě. Aby se nepředal!" = he gave me just two. I sincerely-hope he hadn't "overgiven" himself [that scoundrel]!" <- really difficult to render it in English :D
Lepidum. Nihil aeque salsum nos habemus, saltem nihil quod praesto in mentem nunc venit. :(
 

cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
Manoeuvres is another word I need to translate. I have two, Ventilation Manoeuvres & Airway Manoeuvres. The outcome doesn't have to be successful, it is just what was tried.
I was wondering if I could use expertus: something like
insufflatio experta
—singula manu
—binis manibus
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I was wondering if I could use expertus: something like
insufflatio experta
Hm, no, I don't think that works very well. Maybe temptata instead.
—singula manu
—binis manibus
I'm not sure what you mean here with the distributives. Would several people be trying simultaneously, each with one or two hands? If you're referring just to one hand of one person and both hands of one person, it'd usually just be una manu and ambabus manibus or utraque manu.

I'm sorry but I know little about medicine so I'm not always sure what you're talking about and I have to ask questions.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Maybe temptata instead.
Or maybe just facta. "Manoeuvre" doesn't imply that it was successful, but it doesn't imply that it was unsuccessful, either, right?
 

cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
I'm sorry but I know little about medicine so I'm not always sure what you're talking about and I have to ask questions.
Thanks :) It would be both hands of one person simultaneously, so presumably ambabus manibus
Does facta not give the feeling that it was successful?

What would you say for concentration of a drug? I am completely at a loss.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Does facta not give the feeling that it was successful?
Out of context I think it just means that the thing was "done" or "performed" but isn't explicit as to the outcome of the thing that was performed.
What would you say for concentration of a drug? I am completely at a loss.
Portio...?
 
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