Translations for Medical App

scrabulista

Consul
Staff member
I guess I never posted this:

Would humerus work for the upper arm bone, and umerus for the shoulder?
 

cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
Is obseptum attested as a noun? I know s(a)eptum is, but it's more like an enclosure.
Hadn't thought of that.
I found was Silus Italicus Punica XII
dumque tenet socios dura atque obsaepta uiarum
rumpere nitentis lentus labor, ipse propinqua
stagnorum terraeque simul miracula lustrat.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Adjectives used substantively in the neuter plural to mean "[insert adjective] places" aren't uncommon (it can theoretically be done with any adjective) but that's different from saying obsaeptum to mean a block.
 

Quasus

Civis Illustris
I though maybe the nerve inhibitur and the signal intercluditur? Then what is done to the nerve would be inhibitio.
 

cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
what about impeditus?
I thought inhibitio might be the best, but then it occurred to me that quite a number of our blocks are put in fascial planes, in which case the name is relating more to the position, rather than nerves blocked.

What do you think about a Fascia Iliaca Block? That is a block below the fascia iliaca. Could we do impeditus fasciā iliacā?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
One clarification needed: are we trying to name the act of blocking (Quasus's interpretation) or the thing/substance that blocks? I first thought it was the latter, for some reason, but after Quasus's post the other interpretation suddenly seemed more likely.
 

cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
@Quasus's interpretation looked really good, because you are blocking a nerve. Then I realised it isn't necessarily a named nerve, and often we put it in an area rather than around a nerve. This makes me think we should describe the result of the action at the site. Perhaps it would be similar to saying we put a roadblock at the XYZ roundabout.
 

cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
Another idea:
How about something like torpendum oculo
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
What are you trying to say?
 

cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
numbing of the eye
That is basically what we mean by block, so I thought maybe it might be another way of expressing things.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
numbing of the eye
Torpendum oculo is more like "the eye ought to be numb".
That is basically what we mean by block
I'm confused... From the previous conversation I was under the impression that you were seeking a general name for a block, rather than one for the eye specifically.
 

cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
No you are correct, I was just using that as an example.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
As a noun? No.
 

cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
OK, take 21...

How about torpor occuli (for eye block)?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Oculi has only one c. For the rest, your phrase means basically "numbness of the eye". I guess that could be used in some contexts, but it would describe the effect rather than the substance or the act of applying it.
 

cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
Thanks :)

What do you think of "Delivery", as in time that a baby is born.

Hōra Partūrae? Infans partus?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
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