Where's the genitive at?

Dantius

Homo Sapiens
Staff member
B) You can do all of this as post-reading/post-translating exercises, but if that's what is meant, the article is simply stating the obvious in presenting methods that are decades old ... there's nothing new about that – unless all you ever do in Anglo-American classrooms is truly just to translate without any follow-up.
that's kind of how the ap latin class at my school works, unfortunately – I frequently find that students learn a literal translation of the passage but don't actually end up understanding what's happening in the passage or what the context is
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
Ok ... that's a bit weird (didactically speaking) ... in Germany, you usually translate texts and then follow it up with some post-reading/interpretation exercises.
 
That's what is done in modern languages, but in modern languages, the texts are usually easier and the foreign language is spoken in class. Most classical Latin texts (or Greek for that matter) are usually not understood by school students on first reading (actually, I know many Latin university students near the end of their studies whom I couldn't ask to paraphrase a text quickly). You can of course deal with sentences and texts along comprehension questions like quis quid ubi quibus auxiliis cur quomodo quando, but it usually requires (quite) a bit of help from the teacher.

None of this is new, though, is it?
Not new at all (nihil novum sub sole), and all of us who have gotten up to that level have had that sort of experience. This is one reason why I changed to Ørberg for my Latin 1's. It starts them out early in this sort of thing, but not at the expense of grammar the way some "modern" approaches like to do. I understand that some people are developing similar materials for Greek.
 

Big Horn

Active Member
That's what is done in modern languages, but in modern languages, the texts are usually easier and the foreign language is spoken in class. Most classical Latin texts (or Greek for that matter) are usually not understood by school students on first reading (actually, I know many Latin university students near the end of their studies whom I couldn't ask to paraphrase a text quickly). You can of course deal with sentences and texts along comprehension questions like quis quid ubi quibus auxiliis cur quomodo quando, but it usually requires (quite) a bit of help from the teacher.

None of this is new, though, is it?
A long-time member of a Classics faculty once told me that the ability to read Latin with the facility that we read our own language or other modern languages generally develops when a person is a Ph. D. candidate; Greek can take longer. This is the reason that after a hiatus of almost a century we are seeing a return of courses—at graduate level, to be sure—in Latin and Greek composition. Eleanor Dickey recently published the first book on Greek composition in a century. It's a wonderful book. Coupled to the budget-breaking Woodhouse, it helps to make Classics fun again. It's good to see the popular reviews of these two books.



 
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A long-time member of a Classics faculty once told me that the ability to read Latin with the facility that we read our own language or other modern languages generally develops when a person is a Ph. D. candidate; Greek can take longer. This is the reason that after a hiatus of almost a century we are seeing a return of courses—at graduate level, to be sure—in Latin and Greek composition. Eleanor Dickey recently published the first book on Greek composition in a century. It's a wonderful book. Coupled to the budget-breaking Woodhouse, it helps to make Classics fun again. It's good to see the popular reviews of these two books.



This is primarily because it's often at that point the the student is not only reading a lot more for classes, but tending to read a lot more in preparation for comps. They become truly engaged in the languages at a much deeper and broader level.

Eleanor Dickey -- I'm a fan boy. Her work on the Colloquia and language education in ancient times is also invaluable.

As a graduate student in the early 1980's, I had both Advanced Greek and Advanced Latin Prose Composition as required courses.
 

Big Horn

Active Member
This is primarily because it's often at that point the the student is not only reading a lot more for classes, but tending to read a lot more in preparation for comps. They become truly engaged in the languages at a much deeper and broader level.

Eleanor Dickey -- I'm a fan boy. Her work on the Colloquia and language education in ancient times is also invaluable.

As a graduate student in the early 1980's, I had both Advanced Greek and Advanced Latin Prose Composition as required courses.
I love this book. It opened a whole new world for me. She seems to have me in mind when she wrote it.


I have become side-tracked in Greek composition by my need to learn more about accentuation. I'm beginning with Chandler and currently plan to finish the project with Probert's two works, particularly the latter. I could have perhaps skipped Chandler, but Clarkson's first line of the review of Probert's second accentuation book made that impossible. Besides, nineteenth century scholarship always attracts me.


 
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