Embrace Eternity

Mike83

New Member
As spoken by the Asari in the sci-fi series Mass Effect. 'Aeternitatem assume'/'Aeternitatem assumite' is the best translation I can come up with, but the difficulty (as always) is with the literal nature of Latin vocabulary versus the more fluid, figurative nature of English idioms.

Any better ideas?

For those of you who know other languages, I'm also wondering how 'Embrace Eternity' and 'To Infinity and Beyond' would translate into Sanskrit (I'm guessing the latter would be 'ad infinitatem ultraque' in Latin, at least in the sense of 'striving towards infinity').
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
"Embrace eternity" = amplectere aeternitatem (for a singular imperative).

Latin does also use vocabulary figuratively, you know. Just not always in the same way as English. But in this case the same figurative "embrace" works in both languages.
 

Mike83

New Member
Thanks. I had always regarded 'amplector' as a verb used only in relation to physical things, meaning 'to embrace' (i.e. to hug) or 'to cherish' a physical thing, rather than an abstract or philosophical concept. For instance, I would have used 'res aeternae amplectere' for a similar concept ('Cherish that which is forever'), but not 'aeternitatem amplectere' for 'embrace eternity' or 'progressum amplectimini' for 'embrace change' (I'd be more likely to use 'progressum petite'). Obviously that's not the case.

That said, I am still wondering if they would be the correct words to use, in terms of meaning rather than permissibility. The way I read it, 'embrace' in the context of 'embrace eternity' (or 'embrace change', or 'embrace life') implies 'to take up eagerly' or 'to actively seek' more so than 'to cherish', i.e. a much more active meaning than the passivity implied by 'to cherish'. I'm not sure how far along the spectrum 'amplector' lies in that meaning. Also, I am a bit unsure about 'aeternitatem' - it means 'eternity', but is that in the sense of 'the endless future that lies before us' (i.e. what is implied by 'embrace eternity') or simply in the sense of time without end? Or am I just overthinking this?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
For instance, I would have used 'res aeternae amplectere' for a similar concept ('Cherish that which is forever')
It's ungrammatical. It should be res aeternas amplectere.
'progressum amplectimini' for 'embrace change'
Progressum doesn't really mean "change" but rather "progress".
That said, I am still wondering if they would be the correct words to use, in terms of meaning rather than permissibility. The way I read it, 'embrace' in the context of 'embrace eternity' (or 'embrace change', or 'embrace life') implies 'to take up eagerly' or 'to actively seek' more so than 'to cherish', i.e. a much more active meaning than the passivity implied by 'to cherish'. I'm not sure how far along the spectrum 'amplector' lies in that meaning.
Amplector has various figurative meanings, including that of engaging in a pursuit.
Also, I am a bit unsure about 'aeternitatem' - it means 'eternity', but is that in the sense of 'the endless future that lies before us' (i.e. what is implied by 'embrace eternity') or simply in the sense of time without end? Or am I just overthinking this?
It seems to me that it means straightforwardly "eternity", just like in English, no more, no less — whether all the time or only the future time, it depends on context and interpretation. I think you're overthinking it. ;)
 

Mike83

New Member
It's ungrammatical. It should be res aeternas amplectere.
Ah crap, I had the genitive and accusative mixed up for a moment for some reason...

Progressum doesn't really mean "change" but rather "progress".
I guess that's a good illustration of the vagueness of English and the problems with literal translation - when we say 'embrace change', we generally mean progress or advancement, not regression (which is also a form of change)!

Amplector has various figurative meanings, including that of engaging in a pursuit.
It seems to me that it means straightforwardly "eternity", just like in English, no more, no less — whether all the time or only the future time, it depends on context and interpretation. I think you're overthinking it. ;)
I was thinking more in terms of time itself vs the contents of that time. A bit like, 'I enjoyed the time we spent together' - is that referring to the time itself, or what actually happened during that time?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I was thinking more in terms of time itself vs the contents of that time. A bit like, 'I enjoyed the time we spent together' - is that referring to the time itself, or what actually happened during that time?
You enjoyed the time because of what happened during that time. The same could be said in Latin.
 
Top