Qui vivat atque floreat germinare!

Salvete!

I need some help translating the following sentence:
Qui vivat atque floreat germinare!

I think this sentence includes a hortatory subjunctive clause; something like "let him live and flourish".
However, I am confused about how the infinitive germinare fits in.
Any ideas on this?

Thanks!
Cornelius
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patrona

It can only be an infinitive of purpose: let him... bloom to put out shoots.

It's not really normal Latin, but poets and later authors sometimes did this sort of thing.

Where is it from?
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patronus

Weird.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patrona

Except the reference to blooming, I can't see any obvious similarity, unless of course there's a reference to a planting place in an earlier sentence that isn't quoted in the OP.
 
Hi All,

The sentence was actually standalone – it is from a letter of congratulations (for my recent high school graduation) sent by a family friend.
I'm not sure where the sentence originates from, but if I understand the atypical infinitive of purpose construction correctly, the translation is:

"And let him live and flourish to sprout forth" (or "And may he live and flourish to sprout forth").
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patrona

Is the family friend known to be versed in Latin?
"And let him live and flourish to sprout forth" (or "And may he live and flourish to sprout forth").
Yes.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patrona

Not that I know of, but it's the thought that counts.
So it could be that they meant something else entirely and botched the translation (either by themselves or through a machine).
 
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