Quo negato & contrario illius admisso

MichaelJYoo

Member
How would I translate the major premise of this syllogism:

1. Dogma, quo negato, & contrario illius admisso, omnium adhortationum ad perseverandum in fide, comminationum si non perseveremus, promissionum si perseveremus, quas Deus in verbo suo proponit & serio urget , vis atque efficacia perit, planeque evertitur, illud verissimum & certissimum est, ac proinde religiose credendum.
2. Vere fideles a fide & justitia, sive obedientia posse totaliter atque finaliter deficere, est tale dogma, quo negato etc.
3. Ergo.



My best attempt at translation:

Literal:

1. The dogma, wherein having been denied and its contrary admitted, the force and efficacy of all the exhortations to perseverance in faith which God sets forth in His word--threats if we do not persevere and promises if we do persevere--vanishes and is plainly overthrown, is most true and certain, and should hence be religiously believed.

Reworked and rearranged:

That dogma, the denial of which and the admission of its contrary plainly overthrows and brings to nothing the force and efficacy of all the exhortations to perseverance in faith--threats if we do not persevere and promises if we do persevere--which God sets forth and seriously presses in His word, is most true and certain, and should hence be religiously believed.

2. That true believers can totally and finally defect from faith and righteousness, or obedience, is such a dogma, the denial of which etc. . .

How should that phrase, "Dogma, quo negato, & contrario illius admisso," be translated? Literally, it seems to be something like: "The dogma, in which it is denied and [in which] its contrary is admitted. Am I more or less accurate here?
 

MichaelJYoo

Member
Or, perhaps an even better translation would be:

"That dogma, which to deny and to accept its contrary [plainly involves] the overthrow and bringing to nothing of the force and efficacy of all the exhortations to perseverance in faith--threats if we do not persevere and promises if we do persevere--which God sets forth in His word, is most true and certain, and should hence be religiously believed."
 

Anbrutal Russicus

Active Member
If we follow the syntax, then "Dogma - the denial of which and the acceptance of whose contrary nullifies the force and potency [...] - is that which is most true and certain..." Arguably this is even less readable than the Latin; I'm not familiar with the syntax of English logical proofs, but I'd put it like this: "Dogma is that which, if denied and its contrary admitted, the force and potency of all the arguments for staying true to faith - A and B -, is nullified. It's that which is most true and certain..."
 
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