Symbols

EstQuodFulmineIungo

Civis Illustris
That's mysterious and interesting indeed. In the center there is the titulus crucis, though, but why would Rembrandt add it in there, we will never know.
 

EstQuodFulmineIungo

Civis Illustris
One of the symbols of the Huguenots (from the famous episode of the exodus), along with the Huguenot Cross.
Flagror non consumor.

Ugonotti.png


The same symbol is in use in many other Churches (the Church of Scotland: "Nec tamen consumebatur" and the Presbyterian Church of Ireland: "ardens sed virens")
 

Michael Zwingli

Active Member
One of the symbols of the Huguenots (from the famous episode of the exodus), along with the Huguenot Cross.
Flagror non consumor.

View attachment 14358

The same symbol is in use in many other Churches (the Church of Scotland: "Nec tamen consumebatur" and the Presbyterian Church of Ireland: "ardens sed virens")
Is that the "yud he vav he" in the center of the composition (or "achievement", to use the heraldic term)?
 
Last edited:

EstQuodFulmineIungo

Civis Illustris
I confess I am totally ignorant of the Hebrew language. The only things I can say in that language are:
bereshit bara ehoim
&
dodi li wa niilo
not even sure it's actual Hebrew, since it is transliterated.
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
I confess I am totally ignorant of the Hebrew language. The only things I can say in that language are:
bereshit bara ehoim
&
dodi li wa niilo
not even sure it's actual Hebrew, since it is transliterated.
רֵאשִׁ֖ית
Totally Hebrew. Just a bit confused.

“bereshit bara ehoim”- you definitely mean bə-rê-šîṯ bā-rā ’ĕ-lō-hîm (בְּרֵאשִׁ֖ית בָּרָ֣א אֱלֹהִ֑ים), “In the beginning, God created”. Well known!

Dodi li wa niilo probably is referring to “Dodi li va’ani lo”, a song. “My beloved is mine and I am his.”
 

Michael Zwingli

Active Member
“bereshit bara ehoim”- you definitely mean bə-rê-šîṯ bā-rā ’ĕ-lō-hîm (בְּרֵאשִׁ֖ית בָּרָ֣א אֱלֹהִ֑ים), “In the beginning, God created”. Well known!
I kind of figured that Q.F.'s "eohim" was elohim, literally "gods" but used by the "elohist" source to refer to the almighty.
Dodi li wa niilo probably is referring to “Dodi li va’ani lo”, a song. “My beloved is mine and I am his.”
That must be from the "Song of Solomon", right? I can't read that book without a cold shower nearby...very sexy!
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
Yeah, ultimately. Dō-w-ḏî lî wa-’ă-nî lōw (דֹּודִ֥י לִי֙ וַאֲנִ֣י לֹ֔ו).
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
Arguable.
 

Michael Zwingli

Active Member
YHWH =יהוה
pronounced Adonai, i.e. my lords (plural of majesty)
Kind of right... You are correct about the meaning of the term Adonai ("my Lord" or "my Lords, variously), but not right about Adonai being the pronunciation of the tetragrammaton (Greek for "four letters", which are the four Hebrew letters yud, he, vav, and he). These four letters represent the four Hebrew consonants in the name universally accepted as the true and actual name of God by Jews. It is the name of God told of by the "Yahwist" source of the Torah/Pentateuch. Jews have since before the Babylonian exile, considered this word, as the actual name of God, to be ineffable, and to actually say the name (or, indeed, to write the tetragrammaton outside of the context of a scribe creating a Torah scroll) in ancient times was considered to be a serious violation of Torah. Instead, the ancient contributors to the Talmud initiated the practice of substituting the word Adonai "my Lords" for the tetragrammaton during the recitation of prayers and readings from the Torah. Modern Jews will often substitute the title Hashem, meaning "the name" for both the tetragrammaton and Adonai. The ultimate result of these practices has been that the true pronunciation of the name symbolized by the tetragrammaton has been lost to history; even today, Rabbis can only conjecture as to how the name is actually pronounced. Early Christian translators of the Bible conjectured the pronunciation "Jehovah"/"Yahovah", but this was only achieved by combining the vowels of the title Adonai with the consonants represented by the tetragrammaton; it is probably not correct. Needless to say, it is a very singular phenomenon.
 
Last edited:

Agrippa

Civis Illustris
Kind of right... You are correct about the meaning of the term Adonai ("my Lord" or "my Lords, variously), but not right about Adonai being the pronunciation of the tetragrammaton ... Needless to say, it is a very singular phenomenon.
Pefect explanation ! Pronounced] not precise in the strictest sense indeed.
 

Michael Zwingli

Active Member
Pefect explanation ! Pronounced] not precise in the strictest sense indeed.
Thank you...Adonai does exist to be a pronunciation, but a pronunciation of a substitutiary word rather than of the Tetragrammaton itself.

The name of God is considered by observant Jews to be the holiest thing extant...more even than the Sabbath or anything else. So much so, that when modern mass-publushed books, such as Chumashim (the rough Jewish equivalent of the Roman Catholic weekly missal), which contain the printed Tetragrammaton have become no longer useable through wear, they cannot be simply thrown away with the trash. Rather, they must be buried in a certain type of place (usually, I believe, this is done in a Jewish cemetary) and with a certain ritual formula, much as one would bury a human corpse, and this simply because of the presence of the four printed letters. Curiously, because the four letters may not be written together (by Jews) outside of the context of written Torah, their inclusion in a composition such as the Huguenot seal posted above would be, strictly speaking, considered a violation of Torah; an observant, Orthodox Jew would not reproduce that image (even electronically), even though the portrayal of the four letters within the context of the seal is obviously intended to be with the utmost reverence.
 
Last edited:

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
Well, Agrippa never said that YHWH is literally supposed to be pronounced as Adonai, he just said it is pronounced that way.
 
Top